skip to Main Content

Regents' Medal for Excellence in Research awarded to outstanding UH faculty

University of Hawaiʻi
Contact:
Kymber-Lee S Char, (808) 956-9437
Public Information Officer, External Affairs and University Relations
Posted: Aug 25, 2009

Milton Diamond
Milton Diamond
Sandip Pakvasa
Sandip Pakvasa
Jon Van Dyke
Jon Van Dyke
HONOLULU – The University of Hawaiʻi has selected three faculty members as recipients of the Regents’ Medal for Excellence in Research.  This award recognizes scholarly contributions that expand the boundaries of knowledge and enrich the lives of all in the community, nation and the world.
 
Milton Diamond is a professor of anatomy, biochemistry and physiology at the John A. Burns School of Medicine at UH Mānoa.  Throughout his professional life, he has been involved in teaching, clinical activities and research particularly at the interface areas of sexual behavior and reproduction and in understanding sexual development.  Diamond’s research has resulted in over 150 publications including nine books.  He has been interviewed and consulted for several television programs regarding sexuality, and has served as a consultant to public and private institutions, individuals and firms regarding various sexual matters.  In his career, Diamond has made distinctive contributions to effective research with worldwide human impact.
 
Sandip Pakvasa is a professor of physics and astronomy at UH Mānoa.  He is an internationally recognized theoretical physicist whose research over the years has encompassed a wide range of topics in particle physics and particle astro-physics, always with an eye to devising innovative experimental tests for cutting-edge theory.  Pakvasa has authored or co-authored over 200 peer-reviewed journal articles, many of which are highly cited.  His many provocative proposals have had significant impact on the progress of theoretical physics, and led to the implementation of a number of new high-energy physics experiments.  Pakvasa has had a long and fruitful career in which he has made numerous inclusive and far-reaching contributions to particle physics.
 
Jon Van Dyke is a professor at the William S. Richardson School of Law at UH Mānoa. H e has created an extensive body of work of great value to his students and other researchers and scholars across many disciplines, as well as to the general public.  Van Dyke has written frequently on issues related to the rights of Native Hawaiians. His recent book Who Owns the Crown Lands of Hawaiʻi? culminates 12 years of research and analysis and is already being used as a teaching tool in university classes.  Van Dyke is an impressive and prolific scholar of written works that span across a remarkable range of topics, including international ocean law, international environmental law, human rights law and constitutional law.
 
These three individuals will be recognized for their achievements along with other UH award recipients at the annual Convocation ceremony to be held September 15, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at Kennedy Theatre on the UH Mānoa campus.  The ceremony is open to the public at no charge, and no reservations are needed.  For more information on the awards ceremony, visit http://www.hawaii.edu/about/awards.