University of Hawaii Neuroscience and MRI Research Program

Research Team

George King, Ph.D.

Curriculum Vitae

Associate Researcher

Department of Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, 1356 Lusitana Street, University Tower, 7th Floor, Honolulu, HI 96813

Email: grking -AT- hawaii -DOT- edu
Phone: (808) 585-8848
Fax: (808) 585-8848

Education

1979-1983 B.S. Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
B.A.
1983-1985
M.S. Psychology, Washington Statue University, Pullman, WA
1985-1989 Ph.D. Psychology, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY

Professional Experiences

2008-present Associate Researcher, Department of Psychiatry and Department of Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI
2007-2008 Research Fellow, Specialized Neuroscience Research Program, Psychiatry, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI
2007-2007 Assistant Specialist, Psychiatry, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI
1998-2007 Research Associate Professor, Pharmacology, UNT Health Sciences Center, Fort Worth, TX
2005-2006 Associate Professor, Psychology, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX
1999-2005 Assistant Professor, Psychology, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX
1992-1999 Assistant Research Professor, Psychiatry, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC
1990-1992 NIH Research Fellow, Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
1989-1990 Post-Doctoral Research Associate, Psychology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ

Selected Publications

King, G.R., Xiong, Z. and Ellinwood, E.H. Jr. (1999). Withdrawal from Continuous Cocaine Administration: Time Dependent Changes In Accumbens 5-HT3 Receptor Function and Behavioral Tolerance. Psychopharmacology, 142: 352-359.

King, G.R., and Ellinwood, E.H. (1999). Blockade of Accumbens 5-HT3 Receptor Down Regulation by Ondansetron Administered During Continuous Cocaine Administration. European Journal of Pharmacology 364: 79-87.

King, G.R., Xiong, Z., Douglas, S., and Ellinwood, E.H. (1999). The Effects of Continuous Cocaine Dose on the Induction of Behavioral Tolerance and Dopamine Autoreceptor Function. European Journal of Pharmacology. 376: 207-215.

King, G.R., Xiong, Z., Douglas, S., and Ellinwood, E.H. (2000). Long-term Blockade of Cocaine Sensitization by Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonist. European Journal of Pharmacology. 394: 97-101.

E.H. Ellinwood, King, G.R., Davidson, C., and Lee, T.H. (2000). DS121 potentiates the effect of cocaine on locomotion and reduces tolerance in cocaine tolerant rats. Behavioral Brain Research 11: 169-175.

King, G.R., G. Pinto, J. Konen, C. Hillburn, S. Tran, W. Love, R. Cayse, G. Castro (2002). The Effects of Continuous Cocaine Duration on the Induction of Behavioral Tolerance and Dopamine Autoreceptor Function. European Journal of Pharmacology, 446, 111-118.

King, G.R., G. Pinto, J. Konen, G. Castro, S. Tran, C. Hilburn (2002). The effects of continuous 5-HT3 receptor antagonist administration on the subsequent behavioral response to cocaine. European Journal of Pharmacology. 449, 253-259.

Ellinwood, E.H., C. Davidson, H. Yu, G.R. King & T.H. Lee (2002). Effects of daily dose duration of direct and indirect dopamine receptor agonists: cocaine cross-tolerance following chronic regimens. Neurospsychopharmacology 12, 407-415.

Matell, M., King, G.R., and Meck, W. (2004). Differential Modulation of Clock Speed by the Administration of Intermittent versus Continuous Cocaine. Behavioral Neuroscience.

G.R. King, C. Hilburn, G. Pinto, J. Konen (2004). The Effects of Continuous Cocaine Dose, Treatment and Withdrawal Duration on the Induction of Behavioral Tolerance and Dopamine Autoreceptor Function. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 78: 293-300.

King, G.R., & Ellinwood, E.H., Jr. (2004). Amphetamines and other stimulants. In: J.H. Lowinson, P. Ruiz, and R.B. Millman (Eds.), Substance Abuse: A Comprehensive Textbook (4th Edition). Baltimore, MD: Williams and Wilkins.

Ongoing Research Topics

“Methamphetamine Psychosis: A model in man and mouse"
“Investigating brain function in abstinent cannabis users, using TMS and fMRI”







University of Hawaii | John A. Burns School of Medicine | The Queen's Medical Center

Last Updated: April 2010
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