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JOHN YOUNG MUSEUM OF ART


Upcoming Exhibition | Shooting Wallpaper: Brigitte Zieger

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Shooting Wallpaper: Brigitte Zieger
September 5 – December 1, 2017
John Young Museum of Art, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Tuesday, September 5
4:00-6:00 p.m. Reception and artist conversation
John Young Museum of Art, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Inspired by 18th century French toile de Jouy printed textiles and wallpaper, Paris-based artist Brigitte Zieger reimagines the designs through video installations. Zieger creates visual tensions by pairing historic utopian references with violent, thought-provoking visuals from contemporary society. Shooting Wallpaper  (2006) presents idyllic pastoral motifs that turn into unexpected animated surfaces. The female shepherd suddenly stands, walks towards the viewer, and begins shooting a gun before turning back around and once again becomes camouflaged within the wallpaper patterns. The exhibition consists of four animated wallpapers including: Shooting Wallpaper (2006), Exploding Wallpaper (2007), Tank Wallpaper (2009), and Bewildered (2012). Each one asks viewers to think about what we present in our home, what our decor is made up of, and what realities they keep out of sight.

The exhibition will include a selection of 18th and 19th century French porcelain, generously donated by Steven and Ginger Spiegel, that is part of the permanent collection of the John Young Museum of Art. Juxtaposing Zieger’s animations with the French porcelain repositions the collection and invites questions into hidden social meanings.

ARTIST INFO:
Brigitte Zieger has participated in numerous international exhibitions and artistic events such as Abracadabra at the Tate Modern, London (1999), Shadows Dream the Man with Kara Walker at the L’Aître Saint-Maclou (2010), Digital Hand at the National Museum of Fine Arts, Taipei (2010), Bang! Bang! at the CCA Kunsthalle, Andratx (2011), Tirs Reloaded/Pacific Standard Time at Here Is Elsewhere Gallery in Los Angeles (2012), Metamatic Reloaded at the Tinguely Museum in Basel, and Motopoétique at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Lyon (2014). Recent solo shows include Wallpapered at Millennium Court Art Centre, Belfast/Portadown (2013), Pieces of Possible History at the Gallery Odile Ouizeman, Paris (2014), and Other Scenes at Void Gallery, Derry, Northern Ireland (2017). Her video Shooting Wallpaper was recently included the collections of the Nevada Museum of Art and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Tuesday, September 5
4:00 – 6:00 p.m. Opening Reception and artist conversation

SPONSORS:
John Young Museum of Art, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Student Activity and Program Fee Board, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa, and anonymous donors.

Gallery hours:
Mon. – Fri. 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. or by appointment
Closed: Sat. – Sun.; Veterans Day, Nov. 10; Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 23; Non-instructional Day, Nov. 24.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated. Parking fees may apply.

 
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John Young Collection on view from May–September 2017

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Currently on view at the John Young Museum of Art is a selection of artworks from our permanent collection, including artworks from Asia, Southeast Asia, the Pacific Islands, Africa, and Mesoamerica. Many of these works were presented at the John Young Museum of Art when it opened to the public in Krauss Hall in 1999. Additionally we are screening a selection of artist videos produced by the John Young Museum of Art from recent exhibitions.

Please note: We are open for special events and by appointment only throughout Summer 2017. Starting September 2017 we will resume our regular hours. Contact Assistant Curator, Marion Cadora for more information (mcadora@hawaii.edu).

 
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UHM ART: CRITICAL GEOGRAPHY IN HAWAI’I SERIES

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This series highlights local and international artists who address social-cultural concerns associated with space, place, and environment in O‘ahu. Programs consider diverse approaches by artists including mapping and map-making and visual story-telling.

ULA LEO by ‘Imaikalani Kalahele + Cory Taum 
March 3 – May 5
John Young Museum of Art
Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa

Ula Leo is a collection of work by ‘Imaikalani Kalahele (Hawai‘i-based artist and poet) and Cory Taum (Hawai‘i-based artist) that considers the relationship between urban development, environmental degradation, cultural memory, and resistance.  This multi-generational exhibition includes paintings, sculptures, poetry, and artist videos addressing specific sites, spaces, and landscapes of O’ahu and illustrating stories from a Hawaiian perspective. 

ARTIST CONVERSATIONS + OPENING EVENT: March 19, 1:00-4:00pm, John Young Museum of Art 
PANEL DISCUSSION w/ ‘Imaikalani Kalahele, Cory Taum, and Noelle M.K.Y. Kahanu: April 20, 12:00-2:00pm, John Young Museum of Art

MAP OFFICE: Artists in Residence
February 27 – March 10, 2017
MAP Office is a multidisciplinary platform devised by Laurent Gutierrez (b. Casablanca) and Valérie Portefaix (b. Saint-Etienne). This duo of artists has been based in Hong Kong since 1996 working on physical and imaginary territories using varied means of expression including drawing, mapping, and photography. Their projects chart the long-term history of human appropriation of land. For the last decade they have engaged the global development of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, and the Pearl River Delta region of China.  They are currently working on a number of mapping projects concerned with the history of islands and oceans. 

ARTISTS TALK:Thurs. March 2, 3:00-4:15pm, ART 101
PRINT WORKSHOP: Fri.  March 3, 10am -1pm, John Young Museum

Defne Ayas  Art in the Age of Crisis   
Friday, March 10, 2017, 4pm
Art Building Auditorium, University of Hawai’i, Mānoa 
Defne Ayas, is Director of Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam, where she oversees an exhibition program devoted to artists, writers, and curators from across the globe. She is invited through the Dai Ho Chun Endowment for Distinguished Lecturers at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa.  During her talk, she will be looking at how art relates to the question of crisis, be it aesthetic, geographic, communal, and even spiritual.How does the creation of art relate to forms of energy and raw material? To oil, gas, or alternative sources such as the sun? Could it even fly on rays of cosmic energy? 

Roundtable on Art and Critical Geographies in Hawai‘i 
March 12, 2017, 12pm  
John Young Museum of Art
Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai’i, Mānoa

Margo Machida (Professor of Art History and Asian American Studies, the University of Connecticut), Jaimey Hamilton Faris (Assoc. Professor of Art History, UHM), in conversation with architect and artist Sean Connelly (Hawai‘i/Boston-based architect and artist), and artist Lynne Yamamoto (Professor of Art at Smith College) about their site-specific pieces installed at Foster Gardens for the Honolulu Biennial.  Both new art installations use the locale of the Gardens, its surrounding architecture and other materials as touchstones to envision larger histories of circulation, migration, and transcultural contact.

Diamond Head by Drew Broderick with Gan Uyeda
March 13 – April 7 
Commons Gallery
Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai’i, Mānoa

Diamond Head is an exhibition of new work by Drew Broderick (Hawai‘i/California-based artist) with Gan Uyeda (Associate Director at Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago). The installation considers how images of Diamond Head have played a role in the branding and marketing of Hawaiʻi for consumption by locals and tourists alike.

ARTIST CONVERSATION + OPENING EVENT: March 19, 3:00-4:00pm, Commons Gallery

These events are made possible by the Student Activity Program Fee Board, SEED IDEAS, and The Dai Ho Chun Endowment for Distinguished Lecturers.  For more information, please contact UHM art department 808 956-8251. jaimeyh@hawaii.edu

Images (top to bottom): Sean Connelly, A Digital Performance Map; Drew Broderick, Landmark Looking at Itself in a Mirror, vintage postcard, 2017. 

 
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New Exhibition: Ula Leo by ‘Imaikalani Kalahele + Cory Taum

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ULA LEO by ‘Imaikalani Kalahele + Cory Taum
March 3 – May 5, 2017
John Young Museum of Art, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Sunday, March 19
1:00-4:00 p.m. Reception and artist conversations
Dual opening Ula Leo + Diamond Head by Drew Broderick with Gan Uyeda at Commons Gallery.

Ula Leo is a collection of work by ‘Imaikalani Kalahele (Hawai‘i-based artist and poet) and Cory Taum (Hawai‘i-based artist) that considers the relationship between urban development, environmental degradation, cultural memory, and resistance. This multi-generational exhibition includes paintings, sculptures, poetry, and artist videos addressing specific sites, spaces, and landscapes of O’ahu and illustrating stories from a Hawaiian perspective.

Ula Leo is part of an artists series entitled Art + Critical Geography in Hawai’i hosted at the Department of Art + Art History. This artist series re-thinks the traditional concepts of mapping and dominant narratives of “place” associated with sights around O’ahu. Programs highlight artists who visually challenge the commodification of land.

Selections of the John Young permanent collection will also be on view throughout the museum.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Sunday, March 19, 2017
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Dual opening reception for Ula Leo + Diamond Head by Drew Broderick with Gan Uyeda at Commons Gallery.
1:30-2:00 Artist conversations with ‘Imaikalani Kalahele and Cory Taum
2:30-3:00 Artist conversation with Drew Broderick, Diamond Head located at Commons Gallery

Thursday, April 20, 2017
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Panel Discussion: The art and life of  ‘Imaikalani Kalahele and Cory Taum with Noelle M.K.Y. Kahanu (Assistant Specialist, Public Humanities/Native Hawaiian Programs, Department of American Studies). Event is located at the John Young Museum of Art.

Additional events part of the Art + Critical Geographies in Hawai‘i Series
Thursday, March 2, 2017
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Lecture: MAP Office a multidisciplinary platform devised by Laurent Gutierrez (b. Casablanca) and Valérie Portefaix (b. Saint-Etienne). This duo of artists has been based in Hong Kong since 1996 working on physical and imaginary territories using varied means of expression including drawing, mapping, and photography.
Event is located in ART 101.

Friday, March 3, 2017
10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Artists Print Workshop: Mapping and Print-making with MAP Office and UHM Printmakers.
Event is located at the John Young Museum of Art.

Friday, March 10, 2017
6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Lecture: Art in the Age of Crisis by Defne Ayas, Director of Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam. Sponsored by The Dai Ho Chun Endowment for Distinguished Lecturers. Event is located in the Art Building Auditorium, UH Mānoa Campus

Sunday, March 12, 2017
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Roundtable Discussion: Art and Critical Geographies in Hawai’i with Margo Machida (Professor Emeritus of Art History, the University of Connecticut), Jaimey Hamilton Faris (Assoc. Professor of Art History, UHM), in conversation with architect and artist Sean Connelly (Hawai‘i/Boston-based architect and artist), and artist Lynne Yamamoto (Professor at Smith College). Event is located at the John Young Museum of Art.

March 13 – April 7, 2017
Exhibition: Diamond Head: New Work by Drew Broderick (Hawai’i/California-based artist) with Gan Uyeda (Associate Director at Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago).

SPONSORS:
John Young Museum of Art, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Department of Art + Art HistoryUniversity of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Student Activity and Program Fee Board, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
American Studies, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Center for Pacific Island Studies, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

Gallery hours:
Mon. – Fri. 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. or by appointment
Closed: Sat. – Sun.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated. Parking fees may apply.

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Chine-Collé artist videos are now online!

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We are happy to announce the artist videos from The Laminated Print: Origins + Process of Chine Collé are online! The exhibit at the John Young Museum of Art officially closed on December 9th, but we hope these videos and chine collé demos will become educational tools for artist communities and contribute to the growing interest in the chine-collé process. With special thanks to the artists and co-curators who brought this exhibition to life Charles Cohan, Duncan Dempster, Deborah Nehmad, Yoshimi Teh, Gary Liu and Hiroko Sakurai.

Chine-collé demonstrations:

Demonstration by Yoshimi Teh coming soon!

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New Exhibition: The Laminated Print: Origins + Process of Chine Collé

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THE LAMINATED PRINT: ORIGINS + PROCESS OF CHINE COLLÉ
SEPTEMBER 4 – DECEMBER 9, 2016

John Young Museum of Art

Sunday, September 18
1:00-3:00 p.m. Reception and artist walk-throughs

The Laminated Print: Origins + Process of Chine Collé is a collaborative project that brings together contemporary printmakers, conservators, and art historians to inspire visual thinking about the process of chine collé and draw relationships to paper traditions from China and Japan.

Chine collé refers to the process in which a thin sheet of paper is simultaneously printed upon and mounted onto a thicker backing sheet. In contemporary printmaking it is a technique that has gained more appreciation in recent years creating another option in print studios, allowing artists to reinvent a range of visual possibilities including richer tones, finer details, and experimental textures. Techniques of chine collé originated from China and Japan where traditions of papermaking and mounting traditions have existed for hundreds of years. Chinese and Japanese mounting and conservation techniques require highly refined skills and are considered an art onto itself.

The exhibition includes prints by Charles Cohan, Duncan Dempster, Deborah Nehmad, and Yoshimi Teh, and a selection of Chinese and Japanese scrolls and screens from the collection of the John Young Museum of Art. The scrolls and screens were selected and researched by Gary Liu, art historian and specialist in Chinese art, and Hiroko Sakurai, East Asian painting and paper conservator. Conservation workshops by Hiroko Sakurai and demos by chine collé printmakers will be held in conjunction with this exhibition.

SPECIAL EVENTS
Events are held at the John Young Museum of Art. Admission is free.

Sunday, September 4 (Seats are limited; RSVP only; mcadora@hawaii.edu)
9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m. Preservation Workshop for Printmakers by Hiroko Sakurai, East Asian painting and paper conservator

Friday, September 9 (Seats are limited; RSVP only; mcadora@hawaii.edu)
2:00–5:00 p.m. Caring for Paper: Workshop for Museum Students + Professionals by Hiroko Sakurai, East Asian painting and paper conservator

Sunday, September 18
1:00-3:00 p.m. Reception and artist walk-throughs

Monday-Friday, November 14–18
1:00-4:00 p.m.Chine collé demos by UHM Printmakers

Gallery Hours / Mon. – Fri. 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. or by appointment
Closed: Sat. & Sun.; Labor Day, Sept. 5; Election Day, Nov. 8; Veterans Day, Nov. 11; Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 24; Non-instructional day, Nov. 25.
Admission to the exhibition is free.
Donations are appreciated. Parking fees may apply.

Images (details, left to right): Duncan Dempter, Formats VI, 2014; Charles Cohan, Tool #1, 2014; Courtesy of the artists.

SPONSORS:
This exhibition and related programming is sponsored and supported by the
Department of Art + Art History, John Young Museum of Art, Student Activity and Program Fee Board, Honolulu Printmakers, and Hawai’i Museum Association.

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New video about the John Young Museum of Art!

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Thank you to University of Hawai’i News for featuring this story about the John Young Museum of Art!
Check out the story and video here.

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A Response to “Te Wa: Experimental Looking Lab” by Chelsea Shimabukuro

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On January 20th, the John Young Museum of Art hosted “Te Wa: Experimental Looking Lab with Jack Gray.” The workshop was support by the Student Activity and Program Fee Board (SAPFB) and hosted over fifty University of Hawai’i students, staff, and community members. This short paper was written as an assignment for Art Museums and Preservation Practices (ART 400B) by Chelsea Shimabukuro a third year undergraduate student in Art History at the University of Hawai’i, Mānoa.

I was pleasantly surprised at guest speaker Jack Gray’s approach to the idea of “Practices of Looking” during his workshop entitled “Te Wa: Experimental Looking Lab.” Rather than focusing just on “looking” he introduced the concept of perception as relating to the surrounding space that we, the audience and participants inhabited as we took part in a series of exercises that utilized the majority of our senses.

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In the first installment in the Commons Gallery, I have to admit that I was at first perplexed and a bit uncomfortable. Removing my shoes outside of my home defies social norms, let alone sitting with many other people in such a small space so close together. Here, the element of tactile sensation, touch, was just as, or more important than, the arbitrary and more passive act of watching or seeing. By seating us in an enclosed space and asking us to remove our shoes, our guest and the performer put us into a scenario in which we needed to become more intimate with the floor, the walls and the space bounded by them; this had the added effect of forcing us to confront her movements and disregard of personal space. The pencils were a hallmark of the intersection between the senses; touching the points to the otherwise blank paper impelled us to make visual marks while maintaining contact with her.

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The second installment, in the grassy area in front of JYMA, promoted the role of sound in our participation. Since we were outside, we had to work more to block out the background noise to be able to hear Jack speak, as well as to communicate with each other in what I’ll call the “seeing-eye” exercise, relying on our ears and our feet to tell us where we were. Vision played more of a role when we worked cooperatively, to show our partners what path they took, and when we collectively walked in a straight line; space in relation to each other and the ground.

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My favorite installment was the last one, inside the museum, where sound, space and our numbers combined. Here, vision and touch did not dominate as they did in the previous installments. We all had to rely on our ears to listen to Jack and to synchronize our voices to sing and create a circulation of resonance within the enclosed area. This time, perception was guided by collective sound as relating to an interior, enclosed space and recalling other, bigger spaces.

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Screening of Rescue Archaeology | Contemporary Artists from Cambodia

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Screening & Discussion
PHNOM PENH, RESCUE ARCHAEOLOGY:
THE BODY AND THE LENS IN THE CITY
April 5th, 1:30-3:00pm

Phnom Penh, Rescue Archaeology: The Body and the Lens in the City presents a collection of five moving-image works rooted in critical engagements between the performative body and the transitional urban landscape of Cambodia’s capitol.

A rescue archaeologist reacts urgently, yet carefully, to a transitional moment that marks change and irrevocable loss. A screening program of performance-based video works was first conceptualized as one of many elements of the exhibition and book Phnom Penh, Rescue Archaeology: Contemporary Art and Urban Change in Cambodia, ifa, Berlin and Stuttgart in 2013, which reflected on the artist as rescue archaeologist at a critical time of rapid urban, social, economic and cultural change and continuity in Phnom Penh.

At the John Young Museum of Art at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Rescue Archaeology is an intimate selection of works positioned in dialog with the current exhibition Fragments & Empire: Cambodian Art from the Angkor Period. As such, while the conceptual and aesthetic practices presented by prominent Cambodian artists will offer insight into the relationships between urbanization and contemporary performance and video practices in Cambodia, the works will also converse with Fragments & Empire, drawing on notions of ruins, power and geographical fragmentation, the role of the artist past and present.

Phnom Penh, Rescue Archaeology: The Body and the Lens in the City at the John Young Museum of Art is curated by Erin Gleeson, curator and co-founding Artistic Director of SA SA BASSAC in Phnom Penh, Cambodia (www.sasabassac.com) and features artists Anida Yoeu Ali, Svay Sareth, Khvay Samnang (including a work with Nget Rady) and a co-production by Studio Revolt & Khmer Arts.

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Film Screening & Discussion: Phnom Penh, Rescue Archaeology: The Body and the Lens in the City
Discussion to follow by Erin Gleeson, curator and co-founding Artistic Director of SA SA BASSAC,
Dr. Jaimey Hamilton Faris, Associate Professor of Art History and Critical Theory, UHM, and
Dr. Paul Lavy, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Art History, UHM

List of Works

Studio Revolt + Khmer Arts
Neang Neak (Serpent Goddess), 2012, Single-channel HD video, color, sound, 0:03:55

Svay Sareth (b. Battambang, 1972; lives in Siem Reap)
Mon Boulet, 2011, Single-channel video, color, sound, 0:08:25

Khvay Samnang (b. Svay Rieng, 1982; lives in Phnom Penh)
Untitled, 2011, Single-channel HD video, color, sound, 0:04:22

Khvay Samnang with Nget Rady
Where Is My Land? 2014, Three-channel HD video, color, sound, 0:13:28

Anida Youe Ali (b. 1974, Battambang; lives in Chicago)
Spiral Cyclo (2012), single-channel HD video, color, sound, 0:03:16

IMAGE: KHVAY SAMNANG, UNTITLED, 2011
SPONSORED BY: STUDENT ACTIVITY AND PROGRAM FEE BOARD , JOHN YOUNG MUSEUM OF ART, DEPARTMENT OF ART + ART HISTORY, AND CENTER FOR SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES.

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New Exhibition! FRAGMENTS & EMPIRE: CAMBODIAN ART FROM THE ANGKOR PERIOD

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FRAGMENTS & EMPIRE: CAMBODIAN ART FROM THE ANGKOR PERIOD
March 6 – May 6, 2016
John Young Museum of Art, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.
Location for all events: John Young Museum of Art, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

Sunday, March 6, 2016
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Opening reception
1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Gallery walk-through with Kristin Remington, curator,
Fragments & Empire

Friday, March 11, 2016
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lecture: A Heritage of Ruins: The Ancient Sites of Southeast Asia and Their Conservation, by Dr. William R. Chapman, Director of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation and Professor, Department of American Studies, UHM

Tuesday, April 5, 2016
1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Film Screening & Discussion: Phnom Penh, Rescue Archaeology: The Body and the Lens in the City
Discussion to follow by Erin Gleeson, curator and co-founding Artistic Director of SA SA BASSAC,
Dr. Jaimey Hamilton Faris, Associate Professor of Art History and Critical Theory, UHM, and
Dr. Paul Lavy, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Art History, UHM

Sunday, April 10, 2016
1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Panel Discussion: John Young, Artist as Collector, with Roger Bellinger, Co-Founder of the John Young Foundation and Victor Kobayashi, Professor Emeritus and Founding Dean of Outreach College, UHM

Fragments & Empire examines Cambodian (or Khmer) art of the Angkor Empire, which dominated much of mainland Southeast Asia from the ninth through the fifteenth centuries. It includes examples of sandstone architectural fragments, ceremonial bronzes, and stoneware vessels associated with the styles of the imperial capital as well as their transmission into peripheral regions in modern-day northeastern Thailand.

This exhibition highlights and brings together for the first time the collection of Cambodian art from the John Young Museum of Art (JYMA) and a significant portion of John Young’s collection from the Honolulu Museum of Art (HMA). It offers an opportunity to study the historical works as a comprehensive collection. Twenty-four artworks from the JYMA and eleven digital images from the HMA are featured. The digital images will be viewable on electronic tablets.

This exhibition is curated by Kristin Remington as part of her MA thesis in South and Southeast Asian art history, Department of Art + Art History, UH Mānoa.

SPONSORS:
John Young Museum of Art, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Honolulu Museum of Art
Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Museum Studies Graduate Certificate Program, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Center for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Student Activity and Program Fee Board, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Gallery hours:
Mon. – Fri. 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. or by appointment
Closed: Sat. – Sun.; Spring Break, Mar. 21–24; Prince Kūhiō Day & Good Friday, Mar. 25.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated. Parking fees may apply.

Image:
Architectural relief, Angkor, 11th-13th century, sandstone
Collection of the John Young Museum of Art
Photographer: Brandon Ng. Courtesy University of Hawai‘i Art Galleries

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